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Emerald ash borer predators

Biological control, or biocontrol, may lead to a more effective pursuit of removal. This process involves using native predators to feed on the emerald ash borer, thus reducing its growth and hopefully lowering the overall population of the invasive species. So far, researchers have found potential success in two groups of native predators They hoped that unlike other exotic invasive species which run amok in new regions because of the lack of predators to keep them in check, the emerald ash borer might meet its match in native predators—bark foraging birds like the woodpecker and nuthatch

The emerald ash borer, an invasive species that has killed hundreds of millions of ash trees throughout the country by burrowing in and feeding on the tree, was found last year in Madawaska, along the St. John River Research Issue In 2002, the emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis (Coleoptera: Buprestidae), an Asian beetle that feeds on ash trees (Fraxinus spp.), was discovered as the cause of widespread ash tree mortality in southeast Michigan and nearby Ontario The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a destructive wood-boring pest of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.).Native to China, Mongolia, North Korea, South Korea, Japan, Taiwan, and the Russian Far East, the emerald ash borer beetle (EAB) was unknown in North America until its discovery in southeast Michigan in 2002 The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a pest species that has killed tens of millions of ash trees and has the potential to kill most of the 8.7 billion ash trees in North America. The beetle, native to Asia, was accidentally introduced to the U.S. in 2002 in Michigan Emerald ash borer (EAB) is a beetle that attacks, and can ultimately kill, ash trees (Fraxinus species). This includes species of trees that are very commonly planted in Colorado, particularly green ash and white ash, including the popular cultivar 'Autumn Purple'

The parasitoid wasp Spathius galinae has been examined as a new candidate for biological control of the emerald ash borer (Agrilis planipennis). Research in three northeastern states in the U.S. found wild populations established two years after release, and parasitization rates of emerald ash borers as high as 49 percent The agency will instead emphasize biological control, or introducing natural enemies of the borer. In particular, scientists have identified four species of parasitic wasps native to Asia that lay.. Natural Predators and an Emerald Prey. In Missouri's natural rural forest stands, ash trees only comprise about 3% of total trees. This tree makes up a greater percentage of urban trees - 14% for trees lining residential streets up to 21% in urban parks. Visitors to the state's parks are reminded not to bring firewood into the state from.

Learn about the natural enemies of the emerald ash borer

  1. An initial release of tiny stingless wasps that are predators of EAB occurred in late July in Alcona County on private and National Forest lands along the eastern edge of the Huron-Manistee National Forests
  2. The NJDA is researching natural predators for the lanternfly to control its population. Emerald ash borer This beetle has destroyed tens of millions of ash trees throughout the U.S. and Canada
  3. The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a green buprestid or jewel beetle native to north-eastern Asia that feeds on ash species. Females lay eggs in bark crevices on ash trees, and larvae feed underneath the bark of ash trees to emerge as adults in one to two years
  4. For several years, the U.S. Department of Agriculture's Animal and Plant Health Inspection Service (APHIS) has used the emerald ash borer's (EAB) natural enemies—tiny stingless wasps known as parasitoids—as biological control agents to help manage infestations. The goal of APHIS' EAB program is to help maintain ash trees as part of the North American landscape and biological control significantly contributes to this goal
  5. The emerald ash borer has four life stages: adult, egg, larva and pupa. Adult The adult beetle has a shiny emerald or coppery green-coloured body. The eyes are large, bronze or black, and kidney-shaped. The body is narrow, about 3 to 3.5 mm wide, and about 7 to 8 mm long
  6. Predators and parasitoids native to North America do not sufficiently suppress emerald ash borer, so populations continue to grow. Birds such as woodpeckers feed on emerald ash borer larva, although the adult beetles have not been used by any American fauna as food

Emerald ash borer originated in northeast China, eastern Russia, and the Korean peninsula. In their native range, EAB outbreaks destroyed native ash species subjected to environmental stresses. Under normal conditions, natural defense mechanisms provide protection, assisted by parasitic wasps and other naturally occuring predators Emerald ash borer (EAB), a native beetle of Asia, invaded North America in the 1990s by way of wooden packing material. In a decade's time, these pests killed tens of millions of trees throughout the Great Lakes region

The wasps are a natural predator of the emerald ash borer, an invasive beetle that has killed tens of millions of ash trees in Illinois and 12 other states. The borer... makes a zig-zag pattern,.. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an insect responsible for the destruction of millions ash trees throughout the United States. Emerald Ash Borer was found in Boulder, CO in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks Ash trees

They hoped that unlike other exotic invasive species which run amok in new regions because of the lack of predators to keep them in check, the emerald ash borer might meet its match in native.. The emerald ash borer, commonly referred to just by the initials EAB, is an invasive beetle species. The green-colored insect is native to parts of Asia, but, over the years, has become an incredibly harmful invasive species throughout North America, threatening the survival of North American ash trees Emerald Ash Borer in Colorado: Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). Approximately 15% of the trees that make up Colorado's urban forest are ash Emerald Ash Borer in Connecticut. Help slow the spread of the emerald ash borer. This invasive insect is now in Connecticut. Currently, there is a quarantine affecting the movement of ash materials and firewood out of the State of Connecticut. What You Can Do to Help. The Latest Map of EAB in Connecticut Regulations on Movement of Firewoo

Emerald ash borer may have met its match UIC Toda

Emerald Ash Borer Resources. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). Visit the Colorado Department of Agriculture website for the most up to date information. Emerald ash borer (EAB) is a beetle that attacks, and can ultimately kill, ash trees ( Fraxinus species). This includes species of trees that are very commonly planted in Colorado, particularly green ash and white ash, including the popular cultivar 'Autumn Purple'. Trees are damaged when the immature stage of the insect, known as a.

Federal, state and research cooperators are using mapBioControl to manage release data for three parasitoid control agents of the Emerald Ash Borer. If you are interested in using the mapBioControl data management framework for managing the release of parasitoid or predator control agents in your program or would like additional information. That could allow young ash trees, which the beetles don't attack, to mature and survive. One of the wasps being released lays its parasitic eggs inside the emerald ash borer's larva, while the. Emerald ash borer, an Asian insect first identified in Detroit, Mich., in 2002, has become the most destructive forest insect to ever invade the U.S. Tens of millions of ash trees have already been killed in forests and swamps, along waterways and in urban, suburban and rural neighborhoods. Populations of emerald ash borer, commonly known as. In 2007, the USDA approved the import and release of four different species of non-stinging wasps that are natural predators of the emerald ash borer. A couple of these species have been able to increase their populations in the U.S. and have had some success controlling emerald ash borer populations Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Boulder, CO, in September 2013. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB only attacks ash trees in the genus Fraxinus (so mountain ash are not susceptible). EAB is responsible for the death of millions of ash trees in the Midwest

Emerald ash borers meet their predator during biological

Researchers are studying — and rearing in labs at the University of Maryland — a wasp native to China that is the emerald ash borer's natural predator. B ut specialists say it could take. Emerald ash borer is a beetle from Asia that has no predators, according to NHBugs, a website managed by the cooperative extension in partnership with other state and federal agencies.It colonizes. Step by Step: DIY Emerald Ash Borer Treatment. Unlike some other tree pests and pathogens that cause minimal to moderate damage, the emerald ash borer is a serious threat that can cause rapid decline and death. Young or stressed trees may succumb in as little as a season or two, while even robust, mature trees may die within 4 or 5 years Emerald Ash Borer. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) was found in Concord in March 2013, and the list of towns with known infestations continues to grow. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators to keep it in check. EAB attacks ash trees and infested trees die within 3 to 5 years

Biological Control of the Emerald Ash Borer - EAB

  1. Today, the white ash trees that have supplied the bats' wood are threatened by a metallic green, wood-boring beetle, one-half inch long and one-eighth inch wide, the emerald ash borer (EAB). It.
  2. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) attacks ash trees from as small as one-inch diameter to large mature trees.This exotic borer is a native of Asia. It was first found in Minnesota in May 2009, in St. Paul. EAB has also been found in many other states, as shown on this map from the USDA.It has also been discovered in Ontario and Quebec, Canada
  3. In Asia, where it is endemic, the emerald ash borer occurs at low densities and is controlled by predators adapted to feed on the larvae and adults. In the US and Europe, it can undergo population explosions. If you find an insect that looks anything like the emerald ash borer, immediately call a local university, museum, or forestry office.
  4. The emerald ash borer is a small wood-boring beetle in the family Buprestidae. While there are thousands of wood boring beetles in the world, most cause no problems at all. They add life to the forest and actually perform helpful biological processes for us
  5. Emerald Ash Borer. Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an exotic, invasive insect pest that has killed millions of ash trees in Ontario, Quebec and the United States. It poses a major economic and environmental threat to urban and forested areas in both countries
  6. NH's Emerald Ash Borer management recommendations continue despite federal regulation changes The N.H. Division of Forests and Lands, in partnership with the N.H. Department of Agriculture, Markets and Food has announced that the state's standards for transporting and using ash logs and firewood within New Hampshire remain in effect
  7. Emerald Ash Borer (Agrilus plannipennis) - According to the latest degree-day map for emerald ash borer (EAB), adult beetles will have emerged throughout the state (a degree-day model looks at the accumulated heat during the season and uses this to predict the development of insects). Now is the time to watch for adult EAB. Th

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an invasive beetle from Asia that was discovered in the United States during the summer of 2002 near Detroit, Michigan and has become the most destructive and economically costly forest insect ever to invade the U.S. EAB larvae feed on the inner bark of ash trees and disrupt the tree's ability to transport water. The emerald ash borer ( Agrilus planipennis) is a species of metallic wood-boring beetle native to East Asia, including China and the Russian Far East. Most species of North American ash trees are very vulnerable to this beetle, which has killed millions of trees in Canada in forested and urban areas. No North American natural predators, such. ARVADA, Colo — The presence of the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB) has been confirmed for the first time in Arvada, city officials said on Thursday. The non-native, invasive wood-boring beetle.

The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis, EAB) is a non-native forest pest known for its bright green color, devastating impacts on the environment, and massive economic cost.It was first officially detected near Detroit Michigan in 2002, though dying ash trees were observed as early as the late 1990s.Since then, federal and state agencies, non-profit groups, and a variety of other. of many aspects of the life stages of the emerald ash borer. Part II. Control and Management. EAB presents particular challenges due in large part to the fact that it is an introduced pest and its new ecosystem lacks the predators, parasitoids and pathogens of its own native habitat. Controlling EA Emerald Ash Borer Predator Introduced in Boulder, Colorado. Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is an exotic beetle that was discovered in southeastern Michigan in 2002. The adult beetles only nibble on ash foliage, causing little damage. The larvae are the problem - they feed on the inner bark of Ash trees, disrupting the tree's ability to transport. The emerald ash borer is an Asian species native to China, Japan, Taiwan, Korea, Mongolia and the Russian Far East. In 2002, the beetle was detected for the first time in North America in the vicinity of Detroit, Michigan, and later in Windsor, Ontario. Data from tree ring analysis indicated that the beetle had probably been present in those.

USDA APHIS Emerald Ash Bore

  1. The Emerald ash borer is known to feed off all species of ash trees. Ash mortality occurs as a result of its larvae feeding on phloem within the trees during the beetle's development. The larvae emerge from their eggs on the tree and burrow their way into the phloem layer, destroying the tree's vascular system in the process (Figure 2)
  2. Emerald ash borer, first recorded in this state in 2007 by the West Virginia Department of Agriculture. The bright metallic green beetle is responsible for the destruction of tens of millions of ash trees in 30 states. Gypsy moths, brought from its native Europe to the U.S. in 1869 by a French scientist
  3. The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) has no native predators and has spread throughout all of Ohio, and much of the eastern United States. The insect matures just beneath the bark of ash trees, eating vascular tissue of the tree which ultimately leads to the tree's death. All species of ash are affected and the mortality rate nears 100%
  4. An invasive species is a species that is introduced to a foreign area where it is not part of the local ecosystem. When this occurs, the new species has no natural predators and has the opportunity to thrive uninhibited. The emerald ash borer (EAB) attacks only ash trees, which is where it got its name
  5. The emerald ash borer is threatening all that, said Colleen Teerline, forest entomologist with the DACH. She said the insect has been moving steadily across the eastern half of the U.S. for several years and was first spotted in Maine in 2018. Now she said the insects are found in trees in several areas of York County, along with Cumberland.
  6. Emerald ash borer may have met its match. Canopy openings in a forest due to emerald ash borers. Credit: Charles Flower. Woodpeckers find emerald ash borers a handy food source and may slow the.
  7. Tree Predators 6th Grade Program available in a virtual format this fall. This program includes an in-classroom lesson on the emerald ash borer beetle followed by a tree planting on the school's campus. The program is designed to increase student awareness, knowledge, and appreciation of the environment, specifically trees and the urban.

Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis Fairmaire, is an exotic beetle from Asia that was discovered (in North America) in the summer of 2002.The adult beetles nibble on ash foliage, causing little damage. However, the larvae feed on the inner bark of ash trees, disrupting the tree's ability to transport water and nutrients, eventually killing the tree Emerald ash borer (EAB) is a non-native, wood-boring beetle that is responsible for the death or decline of tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada. This insect was first discovered in Michigan in 2002, and since then it has spread to at least 35 states, including Colorado. As a non-native insect, EAB lacks predators in.

The emerald ash borer ( Agrilus planipennis) is a destructive wood-boring pest of ash trees ( Fraxinus spp. ). Native to Asia, EAB was first discovered in North America near Detroit, Michigan in 2002 and has spread to over 30 states. The larvae (the immature statge) of this invasive insect feed under the bark of ash trees, creating winding. Though the emerald ash borer and hemlock woolly adelgid occurrences are not a direct result of the COVID surge of domestic travel to the park, as they were seen in surrounding area for two or more. The Department of Streets and Sanitation is no longer inoculating parkway ash trees against the emerald ash borer, the mass-murdering beetle that's laid waste to tens of millions of ash trees across 35 states.Instead, the city will focus on removing dead and infected ash and replacing them with other species, according to Marjani Williams, department spokeswoman

Asian enemy of ash borer offers hope in N

To report a possible emerald ash borer infestation to the USDA, call 866-322-4512. To report signs of hemlock woolly adelgid or emerald ash borer to the DEC, go to on.ny.gov/3imAzVq or call 866-640-0652. Submit locations to foresthealth@dec.ny.gov, or to NYiMapInvasives.org. Cue the stingless wasps Natural U.S. Predators Discover the Emerald Ash Borer. A new natural predator for Emerald Ash Borer. The emerald ash borer (aka EAB), the relentless insect native to Asia & Eastern Russia, hides inside ash trees and devastates them from within. It has been identified as spreading in our immediate area. With it is the threat of mass destruction. Ash borer predators unleashed . Monday Aug 15, 2011 at 12:01 AM Aug 15, 2011 at 6:43 PM. Small Asian wasps that hunt emerald ash borers were released for the first time in national forests The emerald ash borer first appeared in the U.S. in 2002. Now in 15 states, with tens of millions of dead ash trees in its wake, the tiny menace has developed into a full-blown infestation. Originally from China, the winged beetle loves the trees from which it derives its name, and with few natural predators in the U.S., it has had a field day

Predatory Wasps and Citizen Scientists are Taking on the

Emerald ash borer is an example of how destructive an invasive insect can be and a perfect illustration as to why. Ash trees in their native range in Asia evolved with emerald ash borer and developed resistance. Predators and diseases also evolved that attack emerald ash borer to keep populations in check Emerald ash borer (EAB) Emerald ash borer (EAB) is an invasive forest insect from Asia responsible for the deaths of millions of ash trees throughout the eastern half of the U. S. and southeastern Canada. EAB infests and kills weak and healthy ash trees alike, and all species of ash native to North America are vulnerable to EAB attack Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) in Missouri low. Biological Control Overview What is biological control? Biological control is the use of natural enemies to control non-native pests. Non-native pests can be very destructive when introduced to new areas because the predators, parasitoids, and diseases that normally limit their populations are not present The emerald ash borer is not native to Canada, and there are no natural predators that kill the parasite, giving this small insect an outsized hold over the ecosystem. What You Can Do if Your Trees Have Emerald Ash Borers. Emerald ash borers are treated with systemic insecticides that are directly injected into the diseased trees

It is estimated that the Emerald Ash Borer has killed more than 100 million Ash trees in North American. It has been identified in almost every state east of the Mississippi River and in many west of it. Because there is no natural predator to the Emerald Ash Borer, there is no hope for it dying out on it's own The emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is an invasive insect native to Asia.It has killed untold millions of ash trees (Fraxinus spp.) in urban, rural, and forested settings in the Midwestern U.S.This beetle was first identified in 2002 in southeast Michigan and Windsor, Ontario About the Emerald Ash Borer. Adult beetles are a shiny, metallic green and about ½ inch long. Once introduced into an area, the adult beetles lay eggs in ash trees. The larvae burrow into the tree and literally strangle it by eating the tree's vascular system, the primary circulatory system of the tree. An infested tree is usually dead.

Insecticides Used to Control Emerald Ash Borer on

The Emerald ash borer (EAB), Agrilus planipennis, is an invasive, metallic, wood-boring beetle (Coleoptera: Buprestidae) that is a major cause of ash tree decline and mortality in the Midwest. This highly destructive pest attacks only species of ash ( Fraxinus spp.). Emerald ash borer was introduced to North America accidentally in the mid. Buck says he's seen an explosion of Emerald Ash Borer infestations in several parts of the city. It's a non-native insect, and that's part of the problem, Buck said. It comes here without any predators, anything that's gonna slow it down.. The small, invasive insect infects ash trees and spreads quickly, killing a majority.

Emerald Ash Borer found in Vermont | The Charlotte News

A Promising New Parasitoid Drills Down on Emerald Ash Borer

The emerald ash borer has reached Canada. It is through pallets, crates, firewood of ash species that the beetle spreads. And it is because it attacks this particular species of tree that this is part of its designation. The insect proceeds by burrowing into the wood pulp as a larva or by nibbling on the leaves as a flier The emerald ash borer is a small, green beetle that belongs to a large family of beetles known as the buprestids, or metallic wood boring beetles. The description is apt, as many of the adult buprestids are indeed glossy, appearing as if their wing covers are made of polished metal Invasion of the Emerald Ash Borer. June 13 2019. Closeup of an adult Emerald Ash Borer. Adults typically have a body with varying shades of green & purple and are half an inch long. 5 Image taken by David Cappaert of MSU. If you or someone you know has an Ash Tree ( Fraxinus) on their property, then you may have heard about the insect known as. The markings left by emerald ash borer larvae on an ash tree in 2011. Photograph by Mike Groll/AP O ne month into the invasion of Texas, Allen Smith was driving to the site he calls Ground Zero.

Dismay greets end of U

It is with a heavy heart that we learned of the passing of one of our longtime board members. Outside its native range, it is an invasive species and is highly destructive to ash tre The second phase was a full-on quarantine of the Madawaska and Frenchville areas to prevent any movement of wood even within the area. While this is only a short-term solution, it will take about a decade before. Ash borer beetles are difficult to treat, but some insecticides are effective in killing the pest. Soil Drench Method The most common way to control the emerald ash borer is to drench the soil. USDA's Emerald Ash Borer Biological Control Program Q. What is biological control? A. Biological control (biocontrol) is the reduction of pest populations through the use of natural enemies such as parasitoids (stingless wasps), predators, pathogens, antagonists (to control plant diseases), or competitors. It is a practical option t The emerald ash borer is a species of beetle native to China that was introduced to the U.S. through contaminated wood in shipping containers that arrived in Detroit, Michigan in the early 2000s. About the size of a nickel, the pest gets its name from its brilliant, emerald-green carapace

Emerald Ash Borer - It is Here and Active in Denton County

Natural Predators and an Emerald Prey What's New in Eco

The Threat of Emerald Ash Borer . Fraxinus: Our native Ash tree. The Ash tree is a member of the Olive Family, Oleaceae. A total of 65 species exist in North America, Europe and Asia. It is an attractive and tough hardwood that is used to make furniture, tools, oars and baseball bats Boos said ash trees in the United States have a disadvantage because there isn't a native predator to the emerald ash borer like China has, which is why bringing in the wasps may work Forestry officials hope that some ash species can resist the borers and that supplemental steps such as introducing natural predators to the environment will control emerald ash borer populations. Last week, U.S. Rep. Peter Welch, D-Vt., announced he had introduced a bill that would, among other forest protection measures, provide funding for.

The Emerald Ash Borer: Information about the Ash Tree

Natural Enemies of the Emerald Ash Borer Released For

Now Pokagon basket making faces a new threat, the Emerald Ash Borer. Black Ash trees provide the wood needed to create these baskets. In the 1990s, the emerald ash borer, a beetle native to northeastern Asia that feeds on ash trees, found its way to the U.S aboard shipping crates. With no natural predators, the emerald ash borer is an invasive. Emerald Ash Borer. The professional arborists at Menchhofer Tree Care are trained to recognize trees that have been affected by the Emerald Ash Borer in Indianapolis, IN. We are also aware of techniques and applications that can be used to protect your trees from this pest as well as how to treat them if they have been infested The emerald ash borer (EAB) has killed 75 million ash trees in North America since 2002 (Ville de Montreal, 2015), causing Montreal to invest 15 million dollars over the next three years to deal with the infestation, and plant new trees (Laframboise, 2016). Predators of the EAB larvae include woodpeckers (Jennings et al., 2013) The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) is a member of the jewel beetle or the metallic wood-boring beetle family and, as its name suggests, it feeds on ash species of the genus Fraxinus. EAB is native to northeastern Asia and has no predators outside its native area contributing to its invasive nature here in North America

Invasive species: 5 insects decimating NJ environmen

Emerald Ash borer. The Emerald Ash Borer is an invasive species form Asia, it was discovered in Michigan in 2002. They came to America and Canada on wood packing and hardwood firewood. The Adults eat at the leaves of White Ash trees but that does little damage, the real problem are the larvae. The adult EAB lay eggs in the bark and when they. The wasps are a predator of the emerald ash borer, which is killing the country's ash tree population and has been found in 35 states. The Observer photos by Nick Joos Evidence of the emerald ash borer can be found directly under the bark of ash trees Emerald Ash Borer Adult. Photo: Debbie Miller/USFS, The University of Georgia Center for Invasive Species and Ecosystem Health This kit serves to educate youth about the threats of invasive species, such as the star of our newest toolkit: the Emerald Ash Borer beetle, an invasive species from Asia

What is the natural predator of the emerald ash borer

The Emerald Ash Borer (EAB) recently was discovered just north of Salem in Marion County and at the Green Creek Rest Area on Interstate 57 in Effingham County. The beetle now has been confirmed in 20 counties in Illinois, with the latest detections being the first time the insect has been located in southern Illinois about Emerald ash borer (EAB) during that decade. As a recap, North American ash tree species are still susceptible to EAB and tens of billions of dollars of economic impact are at stake. Tens of millions of ash trees have died and tens of millions more are facing the beetle's invasion FAQ. This fact sheet was updated by Dr. Deborah McCullough and Robin Usborne, Michigan State University, September 2017

Poughkeepsie Takes Action Against Emerald Ash Borer | RedDenver Emerald Ash Borer Update | Ross Tree CompanyInvasive Species | UTen invasive species of the Chesapeake Bay - Chesapeake

Inadvertently introduced into North America in the 1990s, the invasive emerald ash borer (EAB, Agrilus planipennis) has been spreading across the Great Lakes Region resulting in widespread ash tree (Fraxinus spp.) mortality. Native woodpeckers an Emerald ash borer. Photograph by Pennsylvania Department of Natural Resources Emerald Ash Borer and Colorado Insects of Similar Appearance Adults of the emerald ash borer (Agrilus plannipennis) have an elongate, rather bullet-form body, typical of most beetles in the metallic wood borer/flatheaded borer family Buprestidae. Emerald ash The emerald ash borer (EAB) Agrilus planipennis, first detected in 2002 in the vicinity of Detroit, Michigan, USA, has spread throughout much of eastern and midwestern North America as of 2016, resulting in widespread mortality of ash trees in the genus Fraxinus. We investigated the effects of this newly available, exotic food source on populations of six species of largely resident. Emerald ash borer (EAB) is a non-native, wood-boring beetle that is responsible for the death or decline of tens of millions of ash trees in the United States and Canada. This insect was first discovered in Michigan in 2002, and since then it has spread to at least 35 states, including Colorado Emerald ash borer (Agrilus planipennis) is a small (1/2 inch long and 1/8 inch wide) bright green beetle that is native to Asia. It was discovered near Detroit, Michigan in 2002 and has since killed more than 15 million ash trees. Large infestations are concentrated in Michigan and Ontario, Canada, but smaller infestations have been found in Ohio, Indiana, Maryland, and Virginia